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We have just uploaded videos that give the complete workflow for implants utilizing Atlantis to create custom abutments. You can find them here:

https://www.cerecdoctors.com/digital-learning/browse/category/atlantis-workflow

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Also, we have a webinar Monday night:

Monthly Webinar - New Digital Implant Workflow for Atlantis Abutments Through Sirona Connect

The next cerecdoctors.com Academy exclusive monthly webinar
is scheduled for:

Monday, October 16, 2017 from 5:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. (PDT)

With the release of Sirona Connect 4.5, CEREC® owners now have a direct digital pathway for Atlantis abutments. This webinar will feature Darin Lockaby, (Director of Sales for Digital Implant Solutions, Dentsply Sirona Implants) briefly providing an overview of Atlantis abutments, the process of getting started and the step-by-step clinical workflow. Dr. Dan Butterman will review his clinical experience with Atlantis, describe when and why he uses this workflow, specifically relative to TiBase restorations and show some excellent clinical cases. We’ll finish with a short Q&A and a list of resources to support doctors interested in moving forward with this new workflow.

Once again, when you need info concerning CEREC, cerecdoctors.com has you covered!! Enjoy!

10 Oct 2017

Posted by Steven Ozer on October 10th, 2017 at 11:52 am
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Personality plus is the only way to describe Brian. This young Father appointed with the singular focus to improve his smile.  Not for him, but for his wife and young kids.  He was tired of  being made fun of and was finally ready to tackle these unflattering lateral incisors.

 

He can’t even remember how long he’s had these restorations. I can’t imagine how long someone could look at themselves in the mirror each morning and think that this was a “look” was acceptable.  Never the less, Brian was ready for a change.

 

The existing Maryland Wing bridges could not have originally be fabricated with the laterals so angulated and out of the alignment.  I couldn’t imagine what could have caused these restorations to migrate into these positions over the years.  Without understand the how and why, we pushed forward with a plan to reconstruct proper contours of the laterals with either new Maryland Wing bridges or Cantilever bridges. 

 

Due to the asymmetry of the centrals and the mesio-distal spacing for each lateral incisor, we agreed to prepare the centrals for bridge abutments and cantilever the lateral on each side. This allowed us the greatest opportunity to control the esthetic outcome.

 

Both centrals were prepared for full coverage crowns. The case was designed using BioIndividual, Biojaw was used to create the final proposals.  A 4 unit milled TelioCad bridge was fabricated has a  provisional for the patient. The temporary was also used as a template for the final contours.  Printed models from Infinident were ordered.  These can be very helpful during the final shaping, texturing and the stain/glazing of the final eMax bridges. 

 

After the patient approved the restorations, the bridges were bonded with Ivoclar’s Esthetic Cement protocol.

 

The patient was very pleased with the final results, giving him a new found confidence and  smile he could be proud of.  His children will now need to find something new about Dad to make fun of!! 

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02 Oct 2017

Posted by Anthony Ponzio on October 2nd, 2017 at 09:32 am
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Just thought I would share a case I completed on Friday where I previously succumbed to the definition of insanity-doing the same thing over and over and expecting a different result! Patient is a 46 year old male(neighbor of mine) who has a clear history of bruxism and has had his lateral incisors bonded many times(including by me) over the years.  Here is how he presented:

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Now, the last couple of times I really tried to make sure there was no pressure on the laterals...we have had discussions about a more comprehensive treatment plan but that is not really in the cards for him at this time.  He was looking for a more definitive solution for the laterals, and I was trying to figure out why he keeps snapping his bonding off.  Well, trying to think about things a little more thoroughly, I took a look at his maxillary canines and his lateral movements-here is what I saw:

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Obviously, he has lost his canine guidance and has been whacking on the laterals, which has caused him to ruin any bonding he had done.  I probably could have bonded this 100 more times and still had the same problems.  So, we decided to try something I picked up at a composite course from Dr. Ron Jackson(great instructor, by the way), and restore the canine guidance with composite-now, this will likely wear back down over time, but we can monitor it at his recare appointments and "refresh" the composite as needed-and since an overhaul isn't a possibility right now, this is a nice compromise.  So, we prepared 7 and 10 for all porcelain crowns, keeping the lingual margin above the cingulum to preserve as much tooth structure as possible, and built up the incisal edges of 6 and 11 with composite:

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We restored 7 and 10 with e.max A-3 MT with some white at the mesial line angle(Kris:)) and a little sunset at the gingival...added some texture to try and get the appropriate light reflection.  The patient was happy(as was I), and hopefully this gives him some stability in that area.  I have had many frustrating cases over the years where I have bonded an anterior tooth only to have it get chipped a few months later...especially when I have stayed in the "single-tooth" mindset.  Probably could have saved myself a lot of headaches just by thinking about things differently, as in this case...hopefully this helps someone else who has faced the same situation!

29 Sep 2017

Got a new patient and he said he was ready for his implant crown. The implant was placed a out a year ago.  it is so challenging to restore poorly placed implants and tales so much more time to get compromised results when there is poor planning.

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the implant was too distal and too palatal.  That made it more work then this should be.  Just a tough case and the position compromised the final result.

 

 

25 Sep 2017

Here is the second case presented at DS World. Another case where things didn't go quite as planned but it had some good tricks and tips. 

This is a woman who is in her mid thirties, an engineer and has a twin sister. She had trauma to #9 and her smile no longer looks the same as her sister's smile and she wants it fixed. She also hates the grey band on #8. She has had several consults with different providers and would like both of her front teeth fixed. The important characteristics to her was that they were the same size and they looked "natural."

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I struggled a little with this case prepping #8 because there was no prior work done and this was purely for esthetics. I brought up different possibilities of what we could do, but in the end the patient really wanted to teeth to match. For esthetic reasons, it is best have similar prep designs. I also chose to use an opaquer to block out the grey band in the tooth. 

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For this case I decided to use Biogeneric Individual. This is a case I did in one visit so I did not do a wax-up. When I design case like this, I love to use the Grid Mode to line up the midline and angles of the teeth. This can be placed easily by pushing "Control G".

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The other tool I like to use to measure the widths of teeth when working on multiple anteriors is the distance tool. This can be found under Analyzing Tools. In this case both widths were 8.6.

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When I first planned this case I decided ot use Vita Mark II because it is gorgeous and can mask a lot of color. After it was milled, I tried it in and it was a little bright but I was going try to tone it down with some staining and glazing. Right as I went to hand the veneer to my assistant...

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Yep, I dropped it and when I took a breath in and moved slightly it was like it jumped right under the wheel of my chair and I heard that distinct sound of breaking glass. What a day! The other fun fact was I had no other Vita blocks so I needed to remill. I tend to think Vita Mark II is similar to e.max MT blocks so I chose to remill in an e.max B1 MT but unfortunately this was just way too bright. I use MT a lot in anteriors so I am not one to say they are always too bright. I think they are often really beautiful but if you really look at her original smile she has a lot of translucency and grey in her teeth- more like a c value. I should have picked this up but I didn't, so I milled this case for a third time in one day and settled on a B1 HT. 

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What can really make or break a case when working on front teeth is making sure you have similar facial contours. I check this by looking down the incisal edges and also by taking pictures to make sure my reflections are similar. I also decided to keep the cingulum on #8 for added strength. 

This case didn't need a ton of staining- just some white to set the framework and some I2 for translucency. When I am staining anteriors I always follow a pattern and my assistants do the same.

1. I paint on the glaze first all over the tooth. This is thick in consistency but thin in thickness. I do not mix the liquid in this.

2. I do my body stain next and blend it in the gingival third, however in this particular case I did not feel she needed it.

3. I paint translucency at the incisal edge in a zigzag pattern with a light touch about 1mm down or so or following the pattern of neighboring teeth. In this case I painted the I2 about a 1/3 of the way down.

4. I frame the tooth with white or cream. In this case I used white and just at the incisal edge and mesial and distal marginal ridges

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It was a long day but she got caught up on her Netflix episodes and was happy to wait for a result she wanted. She understood that I had other cases at the same time and was grateful we were willing to remill to make it right. She was happy when she left. 

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18 Sep 2017

I had the incredible opportunity to speak at DS World this year and was asked to post the cases I presented. All three of the cases I will post were done on a random day in my office. The same random day. It was a day that didn't go nearly as planned but at the end of the day my patients were happy and my team was profitable. It was a win-win. Here are some tips and tricks I've learned over the years from others willing to share their cases before me...

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What's the first thing I think when I see a case like this? This patient needs comprehensive care. He needs ortho in an ideal world but declines the option. The dark tooth on #9 had never bothered him until now due to a wedding in the near future. Tooth #9 has had previous endo. When I see a bite like this my first instinct is to use BioCopy because I don't want to mess with nature. I also lean towards e.max. It is strong and forgiving and easy to stain and glaze.

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The burs I actually use isn't really that important but here are a few tips on preps. For efficiency sake, use a pattern and stick to it. The best advice I got was doing axial walls first, then reduction, and then smoothing off any sharp corners. I try to use no more than three or four burs and always in a specific order. I see so many doctors get caught up in the small details and determined to use as many burs as possible going back and forth between them. This is not efficient. Have a system. Don't bounce around.

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I also use a lot of opaquers when I work on anteriors. This allows me to use more translucent blocks by blocking out the color underneath. My personal choice is Cosmedent's opaquers. In this case I chose A2 so that the substructure would match that of #8. These opaquers have a consistency like flowable composite and that is how to treat it. Etch, bond, add the opaquer and then image.

This is a perfect case for the articulator function. I will be honest, I wasn't using this much in the past until I went down to Scottsdale to mentor and I think Sam was telling me how much it has improved and can really help out with post op sensitivity. I decided to see if this was true so we started tracking it in my office. We decreased our post op visits by 43%. Crazy! Of course there could be other factors but we don't believe we changed anything else other than starting to use the articulator function to remove interferences.

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It's pretty obvious that #9 would cause an interference. It's longer than #8 after all... but this was my first mistake in this case. I assumed that of course he would want his teeth even! You know what they say about assuming...

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My other quick design tip is to close the gingival diastema (or the dreaded black triangle that looks like pepper) from the lingual using the Shape >  2D Circular tool. 

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Here is the immediate seat. It looks a little low in value which is normal when the tissue hasn't healed all the way. My assistant did a great job staining the tooth trying to mimic the coloring on his other teeth. He was happy and left the practice only to come back about an hour later. The problem wasn't that he didn't like the shade, it was that he couldn't "bite the skin of his lips". He was pretty distraught about this. I gave every explanation of why his teeth should be even and that he would get used to this, but to no avail. He wasn't leaving until this was fixed. Out came the consent form because I wanted to be clear...

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So I cut off the freshly bonded crown and remade it. My assistant was helping out with another patient so I got to play with the staining on this one... I also was able to use the same block to mill out the second crown so that was a bonus. 

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I really love using white as a distraction. Matter of fact in James Klim's lecture he calls this the "Art of Distraction." It just means that you get to be a little creative in your staining. Don't use super straight lines with your stain. That is what makes it look fake. Have fun with it. Light touch, feather like in design. I used e.max stains for this e.max A2 MT crown. More tips on staining and glazing in following cases... Stay tuned!

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11 Sep 2017

Posted by Mike Skramstad on September 11th, 2017 at 03:01 pm
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I have done very few bridges in the last few year...but sometimes you have to.  This patient came to me with a ton of pain on a tooth that he said was extracted 8 years ago.  After I took the PA we noticed the problem... an infected root tip that was left.  He has been wearing a flipper.

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He initially wanted to do an implant, but after flapping and extracting the infected root, we realized that extensive bone grafting was going to be necessary and it just wasn't in his budget.... so we did a bridge today (about 8 weeks after extraction).  The bridge was e.max A3.

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He was quite happy.  This is immediate post op today...  An implant would have been nice, but some scenarios a bridge does the job.

11 Sep 2017

Posted by Mike Skramstad on September 11th, 2017 at 12:09 pm
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Prepping a full upper arch next week and just wanted to post this amazing waxup I got from Bill.... He always amazes me.  It is expensive at $85/unit... but totally worth it!

Preop:

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Bill digitally waxes up in Exocad and prints it in an Acrylic puck... then after mill does hand touching and adjustments:

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He then duplicates in white stone in case you would like to show to patient

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Includes a great stent to transfer to the mouth if needed or for provisionals.... and a prep guide:

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07 Sep 2017

Posted by Eric Prouty on September 7th, 2017 at 10:31 am
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IMPLANTS TOO CLOSE TOGETHER

Restoring implants with CEREC technology is now quite common and just about everyone in the cerecdoctors.com community is quite adept at handling the parameters.  I've been placing implants for 5 years and restoring them for much longer.  Other than the occasional odd case with aesthetic difficulties, I've never been stumped with anything bizarre--until recently.

I recently placed two implants on my assistant, Nadine, for sites #2 and #31 (see pictures #1 and #2).  The upper was placed first, while the lower site was healing after I asked my oral surgeon to build up the ridge.  I then placed the lower implant just like the upper, scanning first in CEREC, designing a final crown into proper alignment and occlusion, integrating into the SIDEXIS 4 software, and making CEREC Guides 2's.  The implants were placed with ease.

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Pictures #1 & 2

After appropriate healing, I placed scan posts/scan bodies on both implants to restore them.  I designed the respective crowns and got bizarre proposals, because the implants were too close together in centric occlusion.  Just to verify, I placed tibases on each implant, and sure enough my patient was unable to close her mouth all the way.  Realizing that I needed to study this on models, I took PVS impressions and poured models.  I placed the tibases onto the analogs, and sure enough, I was screwed (see picture #3).  What to do? 

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Pictures #3

After much head scratching, I realized I could figure this out.  The restorations were going to be screw-retained anyway, so what's wrong with having the tibases occlude with each other (protruding right out the occlusal access holes) after I reduce them?  Well, before doing this, I realized that I would have to reduce them too much.  There would be very little left to lute to the crowns.  

So then I thought, how about using stock abutments?  Although I would still have to reduce them a lot occlusally, I would have wider abutments to gain some ferrule with the crowns.  Brilliant!  I had a Guinness to celebrate (see picture #4).  However, they were still too short.  But then I noticed that the two stock abutments had 2 mm tall aprons apical to their margins.  Aha!  A quick call to Implant Direct to order two more abutments with only 1 mm tall aprons solved the problem (picture #5).  

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Pictures #4 & 5

Now I had decent looking abutments to scan directly in CEREC.  I knew the crowns would be short and would require lots of manipulation  to get them to look decent, but it worked.  I milled the crowns and had to carve out some residual ceramic in the centers for screw access to get things to fit together.  I made sure to preserve the flat planes in the crowns that fit against the corresponding flat planes on the abutments.  I adjusted occlusion in the blue phase on the models.  Picture #6 shows the crowns at this stage.    Pictures #7 and 8 show the restorations in the mouth after I luted with Ivoclar Multilink Hybrid Abutment Material.  All that remained was sealing the access holes just like we do for all other restorations.  In this case some metal is exposed.

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Pictures #6-8

Picture #9 shows a bitewing of the final restorations.  They've been in the mouth for just two weeks.  I was still able to get some teflon tape into the small spaces above the screws. The final two pictures shows the final restorations in the mouth.

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Pictures #9-11

Could I have avoided this problem?  Yes.  Before placing the second implant (#31), careful analysis of my inter-occlusal distance would have alerted me to trouble.  My oral surgeon did too good of a job building up the lower ridge.  You can see that my lower implant is rather small and short.  I could have reduced the bone, placing a longer and deeper implant.  Just 2 more mm would have avoided the problem.  

I almost went for help to c-docs for this, but I knew I could figure it out on my own.  Another problem solved with our great technology with CEREC.  

 

07 Sep 2017

This patient presented with #30 crown fractured off with recurrent decay and the tooth could not be saved.  We discussed treatment options, he watched our implant videos on treatment options and possible implant treatment.  He elected to have an implant placed.  After taking the scan and doing the digital waxup it appeared that we could remove the tooth and place the implant immediately.  The roots were short and there was adequate bone.  I informed the patient that this was possible if all aspects of the procedure went perfectly, ie if the planets align.  If not we would remove the tooth and graft the site and wait.  I also did a custom healing abutment which I love in this situation as no sutures were required and it helped keep my graft in place, and started shaping the tissue immediately.

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This was a motivated compliant patient that I got very good fixation of the implant.  It is not often I do molar immediates but felt this was a very good indication.