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11 Sep 2017

Posted by Mike Skramstad on September 11th, 2017 at 03:01 pm
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I have done very few bridges in the last few year...but sometimes you have to.  This patient came to me with a ton of pain on a tooth that he said was extracted 8 years ago.  After I took the PA we noticed the problem... an infected root tip that was left.  He has been wearing a flipper.

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He initially wanted to do an implant, but after flapping and extracting the infected root, we realized that extensive bone grafting was going to be necessary and it just wasn't in his budget.... so we did a bridge today (about 8 weeks after extraction).  The bridge was e.max A3.

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He was quite happy.  This is immediate post op today...  An implant would have been nice, but some scenarios a bridge does the job.

11 Sep 2017

Posted by Mike Skramstad on September 11th, 2017 at 12:09 pm
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Prepping a full upper arch next week and just wanted to post this amazing waxup I got from Bill.... He always amazes me.  It is expensive at $85/unit... but totally worth it!

Preop:

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Bill digitally waxes up in Exocad and prints it in an Acrylic puck... then after mill does hand touching and adjustments:

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He then duplicates in white stone in case you would like to show to patient

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Includes a great stent to transfer to the mouth if needed or for provisionals.... and a prep guide:

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07 Sep 2017

Posted by Eric Prouty on September 7th, 2017 at 10:31 am
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IMPLANTS TOO CLOSE TOGETHER

Restoring implants with CEREC technology is now quite common and just about everyone in the cerecdoctors.com community is quite adept at handling the parameters.  I've been placing implants for 5 years and restoring them for much longer.  Other than the occasional odd case with aesthetic difficulties, I've never been stumped with anything bizarre--until recently.

I recently placed two implants on my assistant, Nadine, for sites #2 and #31 (see pictures #1 and #2).  The upper was placed first, while the lower site was healing after I asked my oral surgeon to build up the ridge.  I then placed the lower implant just like the upper, scanning first in CEREC, designing a final crown into proper alignment and occlusion, integrating into the SIDEXIS 4 software, and making CEREC Guides 2's.  The implants were placed with ease.

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Pictures #1 & 2

After appropriate healing, I placed scan posts/scan bodies on both implants to restore them.  I designed the respective crowns and got bizarre proposals, because the implants were too close together in centric occlusion.  Just to verify, I placed tibases on each implant, and sure enough my patient was unable to close her mouth all the way.  Realizing that I needed to study this on models, I took PVS impressions and poured models.  I placed the tibases onto the analogs, and sure enough, I was screwed (see picture #3).  What to do? 

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Pictures #3

After much head scratching, I realized I could figure this out.  The restorations were going to be screw-retained anyway, so what's wrong with having the tibases occlude with each other (protruding right out the occlusal access holes) after I reduce them?  Well, before doing this, I realized that I would have to reduce them too much.  There would be very little left to lute to the crowns.  

So then I thought, how about using stock abutments?  Although I would still have to reduce them a lot occlusally, I would have wider abutments to gain some ferrule with the crowns.  Brilliant!  I had a Guinness to celebrate (see picture #4).  However, they were still too short.  But then I noticed that the two stock abutments had 2 mm tall aprons apical to their margins.  Aha!  A quick call to Implant Direct to order two more abutments with only 1 mm tall aprons solved the problem (picture #5).  

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Pictures #4 & 5

Now I had decent looking abutments to scan directly in CEREC.  I knew the crowns would be short and would require lots of manipulation  to get them to look decent, but it worked.  I milled the crowns and had to carve out some residual ceramic in the centers for screw access to get things to fit together.  I made sure to preserve the flat planes in the crowns that fit against the corresponding flat planes on the abutments.  I adjusted occlusion in the blue phase on the models.  Picture #6 shows the crowns at this stage.    Pictures #7 and 8 show the restorations in the mouth after I luted with Ivoclar Multilink Hybrid Abutment Material.  All that remained was sealing the access holes just like we do for all other restorations.  In this case some metal is exposed.

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Pictures #6-8

Picture #9 shows a bitewing of the final restorations.  They've been in the mouth for just two weeks.  I was still able to get some teflon tape into the small spaces above the screws. The final two pictures shows the final restorations in the mouth.

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Pictures #9-11

Could I have avoided this problem?  Yes.  Before placing the second implant (#31), careful analysis of my inter-occlusal distance would have alerted me to trouble.  My oral surgeon did too good of a job building up the lower ridge.  You can see that my lower implant is rather small and short.  I could have reduced the bone, placing a longer and deeper implant.  Just 2 more mm would have avoided the problem.  

I almost went for help to c-docs for this, but I knew I could figure it out on my own.  Another problem solved with our great technology with CEREC.  

 

07 Sep 2017

This patient presented with #30 crown fractured off with recurrent decay and the tooth could not be saved.  We discussed treatment options, he watched our implant videos on treatment options and possible implant treatment.  He elected to have an implant placed.  After taking the scan and doing the digital waxup it appeared that we could remove the tooth and place the implant immediately.  The roots were short and there was adequate bone.  I informed the patient that this was possible if all aspects of the procedure went perfectly, ie if the planets align.  If not we would remove the tooth and graft the site and wait.  I also did a custom healing abutment which I love in this situation as no sutures were required and it helped keep my graft in place, and started shaping the tissue immediately.

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This was a motivated compliant patient that I got very good fixation of the implant.  It is not often I do molar immediates but felt this was a very good indication.

 

Ok Just finished this case..

 

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Custom healing abutment removed

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Showing gingival 1/3 of final crown and custom healing abutment are the same

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final crown

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final xray

I was very pleased with the final contours and tissue. 

 

 

05 Sep 2017

I think we often forget the power of what we do everyday, esthetically and functionally. This patient presented to our office about 13 months ago. She was considering orthodontic treatment with orthognathic surgery to correct her Class II malocclusion and obvious resulting issues. #2 was hopeless and was extracted with a preservation graft in our office in August of 2016. She completed not only the surgery but also the orthodontic treatment in June of this year. 

She presented for records in July 2017 where we did a post ortho/surgery full reconstructive records appointment that included a charting, 3D exam, digital and traditional impressions with bite registration, facebow, and photos. We sent the records to Eddie Corrales at Downtown Dental Designs in San Diego. A wax up and transfer was completed after discussions with the patient as to her final expectations and goals. Emax was the obvious choice based on her function and the natural esthetic properties of the material. I chose  MT based on her original color,staining, and age.

Her basic desire was to have a smile she didn't have to think or be worried about, She wanted longer, "less worn down" teeth. Her only real demand was color, which she could only describe as wanting them "bare a** white". We went with BL2.

The ortho and surgery left her almost Class III, but in a great position for the reconstruction. We transferred the wax up one month prior to her prep date and saw her every week and as needed for occlusal adjustments to lock the occlusion into a stable position. She was opened vertically 2mm.  As you can see she is challenged vertically, has severe wear, and is slightly opened in the posterior right. She is 36 years old.

I would change a few minor things. The laterals could defn be more mesial inclined. The midline is still off but was post ortho. The patient was thrilled because we gave her what she wanted and she felt stable for the first time in almost  20 years.

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After transferring the diagnostic wax up she felt immediately more comfortable and stable.

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After one month and five occlusal adjustments she presented for her appointment. Day 1 we completed the Maxillary Arch and Mandibular Posterior. She was in the chair 9 hours. She came back the following morning and we completed the Mandibular Anterior #22-27. Eddie was on site and designed, milled, and finalized all restorations as we continued to prep. Vertical dimension was always maintained by completing the posterior a quadrant at a time. 

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All restorations were bonded using Variolink Esthetic (Light Shade). Again, slightly white, but she pulled it off easily.  She is numb in the photos in the lower anterior and final photos were taken at the end of day 2 appointment.

 

 

31 Aug 2017

Posted by Jeremy Bewley on August 31st, 2017 at 01:54 pm
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I was working up a case referred by a colleague recently and part of the referral, in addition to an implant, was that the patient complained about a chronic dull ache ever since he'd had a tooth extracted a few years ago. A PA from the referring dentist demonstrated that there was a retained root:

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Sidexis CBCT image demonstrated it this way:

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As I was planning his implant for the number 5 position in Galaxis I was trying to decide what to do about this root tip when it hit me:

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I figured there was an accessible path for an osteotomy that would allow access to the root tip, and if I couldn't deliver the fragment I could simply drill through it. I didn't much feel like cutting a huge hole in his palate and risking damaging the vital #3, so I designed a pair of CG2 guides and printed them.

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After delivering the implant I accessed the root

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I was unsuccessful trying to deliver the root tip intact, so I drilled through it, felt confident that it was obliterated, grafted and closed, and here's the postop:

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After using this method for guided implant osteotomies for so many years so successfully, I had every confidence that I would be able to access the root tip and minimize the risk to the adjacent tooth. Guided root extractions.....I love what Sirona technology and a little out of the box thinking can do for our patients!

 

23 Aug 2017

CEREC gives us a ton of options and allows us to do treatment for patients without the frustration to us as clinicians or frustration to our patients.  For me one of those treatments is Maryland Bridges.  As we all know, if we attempt to do this with a lab, provisionalization is challenging and we are at the mercy of the lab for getting the shade and fit correct.  CADCAM has made this a very efficient and predictable option for us chairside.

embedded image This patient has a lot of compromises but really wanted something fixed versus her removable partial to replace #23.  As you can see from the radiograph, tooth #24 is not doing well. embedded image I had her get a consultation from an endodontist and took a CBCT.   He thinks it looks fine and would be a candidate for an abutment but I still think the tooth is toast.  I really wanted to avoid potentially opening a bag of worms with #24 and didn't want to prep #22 for full coverage to act as an abutment for a conventional 3 unit FPD.

So after some discussion, I felt a Maryland bridge was the best option.  In this case, I did prep a little into the canine a little bit.  embedded image

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Restoration at try-in: embedded image

I used a C14 block A2 LT.  I did have to re-fire this case a second time for color. embedded image

Nothing earth shattering for this case, but I'm still amazed how we can do this in less than a two hour appointment and be ultra conservative and get a great result.  I don't know how long this will last (I've been searching on PubMed for articles that Skramy refers to but couldn't find them), but with total etch and enamel bond, I think it will do well for quite some time.embedded image

22 Aug 2017

So I got myself scanned by my wife's assistant and created a night guard out of nextdent's ortho clear.  Took 39 mins to print on the moonray S.  Working on profiles for form 2 when I get more resin in.  Fit was perfect.  

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22 Aug 2017

Posted by Meena Barsoum on August 22nd, 2017 at 09:48 am
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I want to share this case that came in today to demonstrate the evolution in thinking I've gone through over the past several years.  This patient came in because the bonding on his #10 chipped off and he wanted it repaired.  

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A few years ago I would have most likely sat him down and repaired the bonding on his tooth and gone on with the rest of my day. But today I used the knowledge I learned by taking all the Spear Seminars and Workshops over the years.  I asked questions to determine his value system, learned more about his history and what his ultimate goals are. I used CEREC to take a full mouth ortho scan in a few minutes to instantly show him his teeth and what the possibilities were.  

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Combined with photography, he had a clear understanding of what could be done and decided to proceed with a diagnostic waxup that will help us further continue planning this case.

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By seeing the forest through the trees, I took a mundane, direct restorative case and converted it into an emotional, full mouth rehab case. 

"You don't know what you don't know"

16 Aug 2017

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Pt contacted the office today at 2pm and reported a broken front tooth.  Crown and RCT completed years ago, not by me. Occlusion was evaluated and, with the remaining tooth structure, I felt enough ferrule could be gained to place a post/core, crown.  At 78 years old, her main concern was church tonight and how she couldn't bear to be seen (it's Wed in the South, ya'll).  With the hx of RCT, no anesthetic was necessary.  Cord packed, post/core, prep.  CEREC images.  Design, mill Empress A2 Multi.  Bond in with RelyX Ultimate.  I know immediate before/after pics aren't the best for presentations, but I think in this case it highlights the power of what we can do.  While I love implants and guided surgeries, having the ability to replace a front tooth in under 2 hours still blows my mind after 7 years with CEREC.  It may not be guided surgery or printing sexy/cool, but it's bread and butter dentistry that pt's truly appreciate.