CEREC Doctors

Blog Author: Mike Skramstad

11 Sep 2017

Posted by Mike Skramstad on September 11th, 2017 at 03:01 pm
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I have done very few bridges in the last few year...but sometimes you have to.  This patient came to me with a ton of pain on a tooth that he said was extracted 8 years ago.  After I took the PA we noticed the problem... an infected root tip that was left.  He has been wearing a flipper.

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He initially wanted to do an implant, but after flapping and extracting the infected root, we realized that extensive bone grafting was going to be necessary and it just wasn't in his budget.... so we did a bridge today (about 8 weeks after extraction).  The bridge was e.max A3.

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He was quite happy.  This is immediate post op today...  An implant would have been nice, but some scenarios a bridge does the job.

11 Sep 2017

Posted by Mike Skramstad on September 11th, 2017 at 12:09 pm
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Prepping a full upper arch next week and just wanted to post this amazing waxup I got from Bill.... He always amazes me.  It is expensive at $85/unit... but totally worth it!

Preop:

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Bill digitally waxes up in Exocad and prints it in an Acrylic puck... then after mill does hand touching and adjustments:

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He then duplicates in white stone in case you would like to show to patient

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Includes a great stent to transfer to the mouth if needed or for provisionals.... and a prep guide:

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07 Aug 2017

Posted by Mike Skramstad on August 7th, 2017 at 11:52 am
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Here is a case I did on my wife's cousin.  She had a trauma a few years ago that resulted in the tooth darkening quite a bit.  We did the endo and tried internally bleaching twice and it was not successful.  We decided to do a single unit veneer to correct both the dark color and the minor rotation.

The case was done in Biogeneric and the material was Vita Mk II 1M1 with stain and glaze. 

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18 Jul 2017

Posted by Mike Skramstad on July 18th, 2017 at 08:33 pm
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Was just going through tons of pictures tonight and this is a case I finished a couple weeks ago.  I don't do many bridges, but you have have to love the workflow when you do them.

  • Prep Abutment teeth
  • Image preps and root
  • Mill Teliocad Temp and extract root while milling
  • Reline pontic to form ovate pontic and cement
  • After 10 week healing time restore...

Works beautifully...  Also, if you have the 4 motor mill, use EF milling.  Takes  a long time, but the mills are phenomenal.

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20 Jun 2017

I just wanted to show a case that just got seated today.  It was a bridge from 2=5.  I would have preferred implants obviously, but the patient did not want to do the required grafting, etc... to do it.  She was rather concerned about esthetics... so what do we do?  I don't use e.max bridges in the posterior anymore and the high strength zirconia would have not looked good enough.  I could have sent to the lab for a layered bridge... but I tried to use translucent zirconia instead.  I have talked extensively about the short comings of this material.  Even though the flexural strength of this material I used is 600mpa, there is no transfomational toughening present so it is much weaker than the zirconia that we all use same day.   This is Copran Ultra Translucent zirconia from Empire Dental Solutions. 

The result was excellent... will it work long term?  We will see.  The connectors were about 14mm2 on this and it was cemented.  I fired it for 9 hours in the S1 furnace (cannot use Speedfire for this).

Just thought I would post as an option.

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I saw a comment on the boards the other day that asked this question.  It was funny because I am going through a case right now that I had some issues with this.

I don't exactly know how to answer the question to be honest.  There are many different things i've heard.... things like the blanching goes away in 20 min or less,etc...  The way that I have done it in the past was just by "feel".  That is... I want to put pressure on the tissue and I can usually feel if it's too much by how it seats.  If I have trouble, then I will adjust.  It also will depend on anterior vs posterior and how much tissue I need to move.

Here is a case replacing 2 congenitally missing lateral incisors.  He has been wearing a flipper for over 10 years and finally wanted some teeth.  Here is the initial preop photo...

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After doing the plan, we placed the implants guided in the site

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I let heal about 3 months.  Since he had a flipper, I just used healing caps that were flush with the tissue and adjusted his flipper for the provisional.

Here is how the tissue looked at full healing:

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As you can see, I have a lot of tissue to move, especially on tooth #10.  Now, here is the mistake that I made.  I tried to move it too quickly.  Meaning, I pushed on the tissue way way too hard.  It was difficult and painful for the patient (I did not numb up).  #7 was still painful, but not that bad because I didn't have to go as far...

Here are the initial provisionals:

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How do I know I pushed too much too fast?  Here is an iphone picture my assistant sent me two days later (it's her brother in law)

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Yikes.... I had to have the patient in immediately, get the provisional out, recontour it quite a bit and put it back in.  That with a chlorohexidine rinse healed the problem in about 4 days.... Here he is as of Monday:

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So.. be careful.  If you need to move the tissue a lot, do it in a couple stages and not all at once.  You may get lucky and it will work... or you may end up having a significant issue like I did on this case.

 

16 May 2017

I am pretty sure I have posted a lot of this before, but I wanted to post the entire case now that I am finished.  Many of you in the courses have heard me tell of a good friend of mine that had a nasty trauma to his front teeth.  It was a very difficult case to treat, but I think we got a reasonable final and he is very happy.

Here is how he showed up in my office the Monday after the accident.  He took a blow to the face and vertically fractured both 8 and 9 all the way down.

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I referred to my surgeon who was able to extract the teeth, place the implants, and do pretty extensive bone grafting.  The one major compromise that we had was that the teeth were extremely difficult to remove.  Because he had to incise the midline papilla with his flap design, I knew that we were going to lose the midline papilla on the final (I was right).  I could have prevented this by placing custom healers right away (or immediate provisionals), but the surgeon did not feel comfortable with me doing this.  I also could have been more patient with the treatment and let the ridge heal before implant placement or done more extensive soft tissue grafting.  However, he was a good friend and I wanted to get him fixed up.... perhaps a regret that I would have not done with other people....

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Because he had crowns on 7 and 10, I was able to remove the crowns and create/mill a 4 unit provisional for the healing phase.  This really saved me because he would have had to wear a flipper or essix.  With his job, that would have been a disaster for him.  He is in front of people all day. 

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He wore the provisional for several months and here he was 4 months later.  Notice the swelling above #8... we were freaked out thinking we were loosing the implant.  Thankfully it turned out to be a loose healing abutment.

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We then started the restorative process with Provisionals to attempt to form the tissue a little bit (although I knew the midline was not coming back at this point).  I just sectioned the pontics out and left 7 and 10 provisionalized.

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After another month and a half wearing these, we moved on to the final restorations (split technique with infiltrated zirconia abutments and e.max MT crowns on all 4 teeth)

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While not a perfect result, I think it worked out pretty good for him.  Sometimes, a long midline is required with implants on both of the central incisors.  He was happy and he doesn't show everything when he smiles anyway!

15 May 2017

Posted by Mike Skramstad on May 15th, 2017 at 12:19 pm
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#7 is my guess.  Gotta look real hard though.  That just means it's awesome.

12 Apr 2017

Posted by Mike Skramstad on April 12th, 2017 at 11:14 am
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I wanted to post a fairly difficult central incisor case that I just completed...

This patient came to me wanting to improve her smile.  She had some chipping and wear on tooth #8 and an old PFM on tooth #9 that had a previous RCT. 

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The tissue was extremely inflammed on #9 and the margin was quite subgingival.  I determined that she had a biologic width invasion here that was likely going to need osseous crown lengthening....

So first, I planned the case out using simple photoshop smile design...

Here is where she needed her gingival crest to be on 8 and 9:

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Here is where I planned where her teeth needed to be to have correct proportions.  Tooth #8 needed to be lengthened slightly and the incisal edge on #9 was correct based on her lip at rest photo:

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Then I quickly morphed the teeth into the correct position using photoshop:

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So... the plan was the following:

  1. Prep and provisionalize the teeth to the correct position using a diode laser to recontour the tissue based on the original plan
  2. Send her to the Periodontist to perform osseous crown lengthening (mostly on #9) to get the tissue to respond and eliminate the Biologic Width problem
  3. Allow the tissue to heal
  4. Fabricate the final restorations

After removing the crown on #9... I got another suprise... ouch:

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I opaqued the tooth to try the best I could to block it out and finalized the preparations on both 8 and 9:

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I made the provisionals on 8 and 9 and sent her to the periodontist:

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Two months later after healing, we did the final restorations out of e.max MT shade M1:

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There was still a little darkness coming from the root of #9, but overall I was very pleased (and the patient was thrilled).  If you look at the smile picture, it doesn't show :)

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This was a long and difficult case to do... but I feel because it was planned properly and the patient understood what was needed, it turned out pretty good!


On 4/17/2017 at 9:33 am, Jonathan Ford said...

Call vita directly and you can buy individual stains and shades.

Do you know the per bottle cost?